restlio

2019-06-14 admin

restlio是什么

什么是restlio,REST API and web application framework, built on Nodejs, Express, and Mongoose

restlio使用教程帮助文档

Restlio

<div align=“center”>REST API and web application framework, built on Nodejs, Express, and Mongoose</div>

<div align=“center”>NPM version License Downloads Downloads Month Travis CI Dependencies Github Stars </div>

Restlio (former app.io) is an open source REST API and web application framework, built on Nodejs, Express, and Mongoose, which is simple, easy, quick, flexible, extendable and scalable, and which has numerous features and capabilities, including a pre-configured server, an auto-generated admin UI and also auto-generated REST API endpoints.

Restlio is ideal for quick REST API development. It saves you from the complexity of API’s, and helps you to focus on your product and save time. Moreover, it enables you to work on multiple projects within the same framework.

Why was Restlio developed?

  • In order to be used in cases, when a very quick REST API is needed for mobile-first applications.
  • In order to answer the need for a powerful framework that will take on many tasks for you and simplify your work. It does not restrict you with given features, and it does not restrain you from writing your own code.
  • In order to provide numerous features in a single framework. For example, you can manage multiple projects. Moreover, REST API endpoints and admin UI are automatically generated from Mongoose models.

What can you do with Restlio?

  • Restlio installs Express middlewares you may need, and runs the server.
  • Restlio connects to data sources.
  • You can use auto-generated REST API endpoints and admin UI.
  • You can use predefined models, such as apps, users, roles, objects and actions.
  • You can use the user authentication endpoints, such as login, register, forgot password, invite and change password.
  • You can use the ACL-based user authorization.
  • You can use the social authentication.
  • You can access the auto-generated API documentation.

note:

Restlio is under development, so use it at your own risk.

Table Of Contents

  • Getting Started
    • Creating an Application
    • Directory Structure
  • Creating an API
    • API Endpoints
    • Creating an Object
    • Getting Object List
    • Query Parameters
    • Query Operators
  • Authenticating Users
    • Creating Client Key and Client Secret
    • Authentication Endpoint Requests
    • Registering Users
      • Enabling Authentication Endpoints
    • Logging in Users
    • Making Authenticated Requests
  • Other Authentication Endpoints
  • Next Steps
  • Routes
  • Configuring a Restlio Instance
  • Views
    • Static Files
  • API Responses
  • Detailed Look at ACL
    • [Master User Level]
  • Models
    • Field Options
    • Model Loader Options
      • Admin UI Options
      • Data Denormalization
      • Document Owner Protection
      • Masking API Data
      • Reference Counting
      • Field Reference Counting
      • Field Size Calculating
      • Field Hook Mechanism
    • Predefined Models
      • System Models
    • Caching Data
  • Built-in Middlewares
    • Express Middlewares
    • Restlio Middlewares
  • Admin UI
  • Built-in Job Queue
  • Built-in Cron
  • Built-in Mailer
  • Social Authentication
  • [File Uploads]
  • [On the Fly Image Resizer]
  • [Data Synchronization]
  • [Oauth]
  • [API Documentation]

Getting Started

Creating an Application

The best way of using Restlio is the Yeoman generator. It generates a basic skeleton for Restlio based application. If you haven’t installed Yeoman, install it first.

$ npm install -g yo

Then install the Restlio generator.

$ npm install -g generator-restlio

Now you can generate Restlio application by using the Yeoman generator.

$ yo restlio

     _-----_  
    |       |    .----------------------------.  
    |--(o)--|    |   Welcome to the Restlio   |  
   `---------´   |        generator!          |  
    ( _´U`_ )    '----------------------------'  
    /___A___\  
     |  ~  |  
   __'.___.'__  
 ´   `  |° ´ Y `  

? Write app name (My App) Test App  
? Write app slug (myapp) testapp  
? Write app description (My App Description) Test App Description  

After the generator finishes installation, run the server. Don’t forget to start Mongodb and Redis before running Restlio.

$ node app

That’s all! Now Restlio is up and running. Let’s look at the app.js.

var Restlio = require('restlio');
new Restlio({basedir: __dirname}).run();

With these two lines you have a full featured framework, built on Express. Restlio is now connected to Mongodb and Redis, and is using some Express middlewares you may need, such as body-parser, morgan, cors, swig as a template engine, compression, static, cookie-parser, express-session with connect-redis, connect-flash and serve-favicon.

Directory Structure

Directory structure generated by Yeoman:

|--config/
|  Application configuration files. You can configurate middlewares, data source connections, roles, etc. 
|--lib/
|  Custom libraries
|--model/
|  Mongoose models
|--public/
|  Static files (css, js, images, etc.)
|--route/
|  Custom Express routes
|--view/
|  Custom view templates
|--app.js
|  Main script that starts your application
|--flightplan.js
|  Flightplan scripts
|--package.json
|  NPM package file
|--worker.js
|  Main script that starts your Kue workers

Creating an API

To create an API, you can create a Mongoose model, and your REST API is ready on the fly. It’s so simple! Create a file under the model directory, model/test/posts.js

module.exports = app => {

    var _query    = app.lib.query;
    var _mongoose = app.core.mongo.mongoose;
    var ObjectId  = _mongoose.Schema.Types.ObjectId;
    var Mixed     = _mongoose.Schema.Types.Mixed;

    // schema
    var Schema = {
        u  : {type: ObjectId, required: true, ref: 'System_Users', alias: 'users'},
        t  : {type: String, required: true, alias: 'title'},
        b  : {type: String, required: true, alias: 'body'},
        ca : {type: Date, default: Date.now, alias: 'created_at'}
    };

    // settings
    Schema.u.settings = {label: 'User', display: 'email'};
    Schema.t.settings = {label: 'Title'};
    Schema.b.settings = {label: 'Body'};

    // load schema
    var PostSchema = app.libpost.model.loader.mongoose(Schema, {
        Name: 'Test_Posts',
        Options: {
            singular : 'Test Post',
            plural   : 'Test Posts',
            columns  : ['users', 'title', 'body'],
            main     : 'title',
            perpage  : 25
        }
    });

    // plugins
    PostSchema.plugin(_query);

    return _mongoose.model('Test_Posts', PostSchema);

};

You have to include external models to a Restlio instance; otherwise, Restlio won’t load external sources. New app.js is look likes that;

var Restlio = require('restlio');
new Restlio({
    basedir: __dirname,
    verbose: true,
    external: {
        model: 'test' // includes whole test directory
    }    
}).run();

Run app.js again;

$ node app

Yeah! Now you have a REST API for test.posts model that have sanitisation, validation, authentication, authorization, and much more features. You also have an admin UI for this model.

Have you noticed the structure of model/test/posts.js? Restlio uses express-load under the hood. It loads everything to the app object; thus, you can use Restlio abilities in your external files with dot notation, like this;

module.exports = app => {
    // all Restlio scripts are available in your external files
    var _mongoose = app.core.mongo.mongoose;
};

You have to use the Mongoose query plugin, app.lib.query, to query REST API with several operators. You have to pass a Mongoose schema object to app.libpost.model.loader.mongoose function as a parameter for additional abilities.

API Endpoints

Now you have a REST API that listens requests on the following endpoints:

Method Resource Description
GET /api/o/test.posts Get a list of objects
GET /api/o/test.posts/:id Get a single object
POST /api/o/test.posts Create a new object
PUT /api/o/test.posts/:id Update an object
DELETE /api/o/test.posts/:id Delete an object

Creating an Object

Try to create an object: Run [POST] http://127.0.0.1:3001/api/o/test.posts.

Do you see the response? You receive 403 response, because Restlio is ACL-ready!

{
  "meta": {
    "name": "Forbidden",
    "code": 403
  }
}

Let’s allow posting an object for test.posts model. Go to the admin page; http://127.0.0.1:3001/admin. You can find basic auth and login cridentials in your config file; config/development.js. Choose Test App on admin dashboard and go to the System->Actions page from the left menu. In order to create an action for the Guest user, click on the “+new” button. Fill in the form. Select Guest for the Role field, Test Posts for the Object field and Post for the Action field. Try again on your HTTP client.

Do you see the response now? You received 422 response, because Restlio has an API validation!

{
  "meta": {
    "name": "UnprocessableEntity",
    "code": 422,
    "message": {
      "type": "ValidationError",
      "errors": [
        {
          "path": "users",
          "message": "is missing and not optional",
          "slug": "required_error"
        },
        {
          "path": "title",
          "message": "is missing and not optional",
          "slug": "required_error"
        },
        {
          "path": "body",
          "message": "is missing and not optional",
          "slug": "required_error"
        }
      ]
    }
  }
}

Fill in the parameters and try again. Oh yeah, you received 201 response now! ps: please, look at the system_users collection from Mongodb for a valid user id.

{
  "meta": {
    "name": "Created",
    "code": 201
  },
  "data": {
    "doc": {
      "_id": "576d9023420ba27f0475cd9b",
      "users": "576bca775c7a8dee2702dddb",
      "title": "title",
      "body": "body",
      "created_at": "2016-06-24T19:55:15.636Z"
    }
  }
}

It is so simple! Now you are ready to execute a query on data.

Getting Object List

In order to get a list of objects, as shown above, you must allow getting objects for the test.posts model. Edit previous System->Actions record and add a Get permission. Run [GET] http://127.0.0.1:3001/api/o/test.posts;

{
  "meta": {
    "name": "OK",
    "code": 200
  },
  "data": {
    "doc": [
      {
        "_id": "576d9023420ba27f0475cd9b",
        "users": "576bca775c7a8dee2702dddb",
        "title": "title",
        "body": "body",
        "created_at": "2016-06-24T19:55:15.636Z"
      }
    ]
  }
}

You received the objects!

Query Parameters

Main query parameters for [GET] /api/o/:object endpoints are;

Parameter Query Example
query type qt=find /api/o/test.model?qt=find
fields f=field_a,field_b /api/o/test.model?f=field_a,field_b
sort s=field_a,-field_b /api/o/test.model?s=field_a,-field_b
skip sk=10 /api/o/test.model?sk=10
limit l=10 /api/o/test.model?l=10
populate p=field_a,field_b /api/o/test.model?p=field_a,field_b
cache key cacheKey=test_data /api/o/test.model?cacheKey=test_data

Other query types for [GET] /api/o/:object endpoints are; find one count findcount distinct tree.

Query Operators

[GET] /api/o/:object endpoints have a number of operators;

Filter Query Example
equal key=a /api/o/test.model?key=a
not equal key={ne}a /api/o/test.model?key={ne}a
greater than key={gt}a /api/o/test.model?key={gt}a
greater than or equal to key={gte}a /api/o/test.model?key={gte}a
less than key={lt}a /api/o/test.model?key={lt}a
less than or equal to key={lte}a /api/o/test.model?key={lte}a
in key={in}a,b /api/o/test.model?key={in}a,b
not in key={nin}a,b /api/o/test.model?key={nin}a,b
contains all key={all}a,b /api/o/test.model?key={all}a,b
empty or not exists key={empty} /api/o/test.model?key={empty}
exists and not empty key={!empty} /api/o/test.model?key={!empty}
exists and null key={null} /api/o/test.model?key={null}
near key={near}lon,lat,max /api/o/test.model?key={near}lon,lat,max
%like% key={:like:}a /api/o/test.model?key={:like:}a
like% key={like:}a /api/o/test.model?key={like:}a
%like key={:like}a /api/o/test.model?key={:like}a
exists and null key={all}a,b /api/o/test.model?key={all}a,b
between key={between}a,b /api/o/test.model?key={between}a,b

Authenticating Users

We used Guest user on the examples above. However, we need authenticated users in real life. You can use authentication endpoints that are ready in Restlio

Creating Client Id and Client Secret

Before using authentication endpoints, you need a Client Id and a Client Secret. All authentication endpoints require this information. Go to the admin page, http://127.0.0.1:3001/admin. You can find basic auth and login cridentials in your config file, config/development.js. Choose Test App on admin dashboard and go to the Oauth->Clients page from the left menu. Create a client. Fill in the Name field, select Test App for the Apps field, and fill in the Redirect Uri field (Redirect Uri is required, but is not important for now). If the Client Id and the Client Secret fields are empty, Restlio will generate these keys for you.

Authentication Endpoint Requests

Authentication endpoints require a Client Id and a Client Secret. Get the keys you generated for the Test App, and send headers as X-Client-Id and X-Client-Secret.

Registering Users

You can use [POST] /api/register endpoint to register users. email and password fields are required for the minimal configuration.

Enabling Authentication Endpoints

Before using authentication endpoints, be sure that you have enabled endpoints in the config file; otherwise, you will receive 401 response.

  auth: {
    'test': {
      '/api/register': true,
      ...
    }
  }

Logging in Users

You can use [POST] /api/login endpoint to login users. Before using this endpoint, don’t forget to enable it. Example response for a login request;

{
  "meta": {
    "name": "OK",
    "code": 200
  },
  "data": {
    "token": "eyJ0eXAiOiJKV1QiLCJhbGciOiJIUzI1NiJ9.eyJleHAiOjE0NzE5OTMxMjE3NzYsInVzZXIiOnsiX2lkIjoiNTc2ZGJhMzY4YzU1NGUyOTA3N2IyMDU4In19.S1uNjX64z3aNIfEukw60bbCdQbHMOLO4Ei6tvvIc1X8",
    "expires": 1471993121776,
    "userId": "576dba368c554e29077b2058",
    "roles": [
      "test_user"
    ],
    "resources": {},
    "profile": false,
    "isEnabled": "Yes",
    "waitingStatus": "Accepted",
    "passwordChanged": "N"
  }
}

You will use data.token for making authenticated requests.

Making Authenticated Requests

We used Guest user at all examples above. Now we will try to use test.posts endpoints with a real user. Go to the admin page, http://127.0.0.1:3001/admin, then select the System->Actions page from the left menu. Remove the action for the Guest user, which we had created before. Now create an action for the User role. Fill in the form, select User for the Role field, Test Posts for the Object field, and Get and Post for the Action field. We have Get and Post permissions for the User role on the test.posts model now. We have to send a X-Access-Token header to make authenticated requests. If we don’t send this header, we will receive 403 response.

{
  "meta": {
    "name": "Forbidden",
    "code": 403
  }
}

Other Authentication Endpoints

Restlio has other authentication endpoints you may have need;

Method Endpoint Description
GET /api/token get user data for verified token
POST /api/forgot forgot password
POST /api/reset/:token reset your password with forgot password token
POST /api/invite user invitation
POST /api/invite/:token accept invitation and register with invitation token
POST /api/verify/:token verify user with registration token
POST /api/resend resend registration token
POST /api/change_password change password
POST /api/social social login or register

Next Steps

You have learned the core and the most important concepts of Restlio. However, this is yet the tip of the iceberg. Next, we will learn details about Restlio.

Routes

You know that you can use the app object and other Restlio abilities in your external sources. Adding a new route is simple. Create a file under the route directory, route/test/posts.js. Add your route like this;

module.exports = app => {
    app.get('/my-route', (req, res, next) {
        res.json({everything: 'OK'});
    });
};

You have to include external routes to a Restlio instance. New app.js is look likes that;

var Restlio = require('restlio');
new Restlio({
    basedir: __dirname,
    verbose: true,
    external: {
        model: 'test',
        route: 'test'
    }    
}).run();

Run [GET] http://127.0.0.1:3001/my-route;

{
  "everything": "OK"
}

Configuring a Restlio Instance

You loaded some external sources to a Restlio instance on the examples above. There are some other options to configure a Restlio instance.

var Restlio = require('restlio');
new Restlio({
    basedir: __dirname,
    cores: 1,
    env: 'production',
    port: 3001,
    verbose: true,
    core: 'mongo|redis|cache',
    // boot: 'mailer|override',
    external: {
        boot: 'i18n|gitversion',
        model: 'test',
        middle: 'test',
        lib: 'test',
        route: 'test'
    }    
}).run();
  • cores You can configure the number of Node.js instances to take advantage of multi-core systems. By default, a Restlio instance uses the maximum number of cpu cores.
  • verbose If you want to see the loaded modules, use this option.
  • env You can set the environment with this option. You can also use process environment variable if you want; NODE_ENV=production
  • port You can set the server’s port with this option. You can also use process environment variable if you want; NODE_PORT=3001
  • core You can load other data sources with this option. Available options are; cache, db, elasticsearch, mongo, redis, solr.
  • boot You can load some extra functionalities that Restlio doesn’t load with minimal configuration. Available options are; mailer, mailerPool, oauthproxy, override, resize
  • external You can load external sources with this option. Available options are; boot, model, middle, lib, route

Views

Now you have a route file under the route directory; route/test/posts.js. Let’s try to render a view in this file. Restlio uses Swig as a template engine. By default, Restlio is looking for the view directory. You can change it from the configuration file; config/development.js.

  boot: {
      view: {
          dir: 'view',
          swig: {
              cache: false
          }
      },
      ...
  }

Now our route file looks like this;

module.exports = app => {
    app.get('/my-route', (req, res, next) {
        res.render('test/my-route');
    });
};

Static Files

By default, Restlio is looking for the public directory to serve static files. You can change it from the configuration file; config/development.js.

  boot: {
    'static': {
      dir: 'public',
      options: {
        maxAge: '1d'
      }
    },
    ...
  }

API Responses

The meta key is used to give extra information about the response. If the request is succesful and everything is ok, you will receive a 200 response with data.

{
  "meta": {
    "name": "OK",
    "code": 200
  },
  "data": {
    ...
  }
}

If the data you are looking for is not found, you will receive a 404 error response.

{
  "meta": {
    "name": "NotFound",
    "code": 404
  }
}

If the data you send to a resource is not valid, you will receive a 422 error response.

{
  "meta": {
    "name": "UnprocessableEntity",
    "code": 422,
    "message": {
      "type": "ValidationError",
      "errors": [
        ...
      ]
    }
  }
}

If you don’t have a proper permission on a resource, or if you don’t send a X-Access-Token header that is required by the resource, you will receive a 403 error response.

{
  "meta": {
    "name": "Forbidden",
    "code": 403
  }
}

If something is wrong about any authentication endpoint, you will receive a 401 error response.

{
  "meta": {
    "name": "Unauthorized",
    "code": 401,
    "message": {
      ...
    }
  }
}

If something is wrong about the server, you will receive a 500 error response.

{
  "meta": {
    "name": ...,
    "code": 500,
    "message": ...
  }
}

You will receive a 201 response to a POST request that results in a creation.

{
  "meta": {
    "name": "Created",
    "code": 201
  },
  "data": {
    "doc": {
      ...
    }
  }
}

You will receive a 204 NoContent response to a successful request that won’t be returning a body (like a DELETE request).

Detailed Look at ACL

Restlio has an ACL (Access Control Lists) protection on the resources. If you don’t have a proper permission on a resource, you will receive a 403 error response. You can create any role you want, and select the methods you want to give access to any resources; such as, get, post, put, delete. You can use the admin UI for this process. You can create the role from System->Roles page, and then create the action from System->Actions page. Just fill in the form; select the Role, the Object (resource) and the Action (HTTP methods) fields. If you want a strict control on the permissions, you can use the config file.

roles: {
    test: {
        'default': [
            {name: 'Admin', slug: 'admin'},
            {name: 'User', slug: 'user'},
            {name: 'Guest', slug: 'guest'},
            ...
        ],
        initial: {
            register: 'user'
        },
        actions: {
            user: {
                'test.posts': ['get', 'post'],
                ...
            },
            guest: {
                'test.posts': ['get'],
                ...
            }
        }
    }
}

Master User Level

Not documented

Models

Models are the core of the Restlio architecture. Restlio basically uses Mongoose models; thus, you can use all abilities of the Mongoose models, such as, Mongoose plugins, hooks, validations, etc.

Field Options

You can use all Mongoose field options. Mongoose based options are;

  • default
  • required
  • enum string
  • lowercase string
  • match string
  • maxlength string
  • minlength string
  • trim string
  • uppercase string
  • max number, date
  • min number, date
  • expires date

The list of other Restlio based field options are;

  • alias Mongodb key names are very important. Use the smallest keys possible, use the alias option when using REST API. For example;
var Schema = {
  ...
  em : {type: String, required: true, alias: 'email', unique: true},
  ... 
};	
  • settings
  • optional
  • allow_html
  • pattern
  • minLength
  • maxLength
  • exactLength
  • min
  • max
  • lt
  • lte
  • gt
  • gte
  • ne
  • rules
  • pair
  • owner
  • flex_ref
  • entity_acl
  • belongs_to
  • depends
  • s3
  • from

Model Loader Options

Along with those field options, there are many other loader options. The loader options add new abilities that have not been in Mongoose. You have to pass a Mongoose schema object to the app.libpost.model.loader.mongoose function as a parameter for these additional abilities.

var PostSchema = app.libpost.model.loader.mongoose(Schema, {
    Name: 'Test_Posts',
    ...
});

Admin UI Options

With the Options key you can configure admin UI options. Here are the list of the properties;

var PostSchema = app.libpost.model.loader.mongoose(Schema, {
    ...
    Options: {
        singular : 'Test Post',
        plural   : 'Test Posts',
        columns  : ['users', 'title', 'body'],
        main     : 'title',
        perpage  : 25,
        ...
    },
    ...
});
  • singular
  • plural
  • columns
  • extra
  • main
  • perpage
  • sort
  • filter
  • nocreate
  • nodelete
  • noedit
  • nested
  • actions
  • analytics

Data Denormalization

Denormalizing data from another model is very simple with the Denorm key. If the reference data you have normalized before is updated; the model loader also updates your denormalized data. There are two ways of denormalizing the reference model data:

  • The first way is to add a seperate field to your model. Then, you can denormalize data from another field that has a reference model. For example; you can denormalize the user’s email from the reference of the users field. In order to do this, you should add the users_email field to your model. Here is the structure;
var PostSchema = app.libpost.model.loader.mongoose(Schema, {
    ...
	Denorm: {
	    'System_Users': {
	        targets: {
	            source: 'users',
	            fields: {users_email: 'email'}
	        }
	    },
	    ...
	},
    ...
});

System_Users is the reference model of the users field, so our source is the users field. Then we can set the fields. We want to denormalize the email data from the System_Users model to the users_email field. We can set this fields option like this;

fields: {users_email: 'email'}
  • The second way is to choose a reference model. Then, you can denormalize the fields of the reference model to a target field. In this way there is no source field. The model loader collects the denormalized data of every field that has the same reference model.
var PostSchema = app.libpost.model.loader.mongoose(Schema, {
    ...
	Denorm: {
	    'System_Users': {
            target: 'data_users',
            fields: 'email'
	    },
	    ...
	},
    ...
});

Don’t forget to add a field for the denormalized data. In this example, this is the data_users field. You have to select the Mixed type. Write the name of the reference model to the from option.

d_u : {type: Mixed, alias: 'data_users', from: 'System_Users'},

Document Owner Protection

Restlio has an ACL protection on the resources, but those are basically the permissions on the resources according to the HTTP methods. With this kind of protection the ownership of the document is not guaranteed. If you have a users or a profiles field on your model, and if you want to guarantee that the owner of the request is also the owner of the document, then you have to use the Owner key. Just set the users (alias: ‘users’) and the profiles (profile: {alias: ‘profiles’}) fields and select the HTTP methods you want to guarantee the ownership.

var PostSchema = app.libpost.model.loader.mongoose(Schema, {
    ...
    Owner: {
        alias   : 'users',
        profile : {alias: 'profiles'},
        protect : {
            'get'    : true,
            'getid'  : true,
            'post'   : true,
            'put'    : true,
            'remove' : true
        }
    },
    ...
});

Masking API Data

If you are working with the REST APIs, then you will need some important features. Masking the data is one of the important features. You may need to mask the data on a GET, a POST or a PUT request. You have to use the Mask key to mask the data. You can configure the masking options according to an HTTP method, and, according to the role or the ownership level as well.

var PostSchema = app.libpost.model.loader.mongoose(Schema, {
    ...
    Mask: {
        'get': {guest: 'title,body,created_at'},
        'post': {owner: 'title,body'},
        'put': {owner: 'title,body'}
	},
    ...
});

The available levels for an HTTP method are; master, owner, user, guest.

Reference Counting

Sometimes you may need the count in a reference model. We have the test.posts model at the examples above. If you create a test.comments model, and if you want to store the count of the comments in a collection on the test.posts model, you can use this feature. Just add a field on the test.posts model for the comment count. Use the CountRef key to set the reference counting on the test.comments model. Our test.comments schema;

module.exports = app => {

    var _query    = app.lib.query;
    var _mongoose = app.core.mongo.mongoose;
    var ObjectId  = _mongoose.Schema.Types.ObjectId;
    var Mixed     = _mongoose.Schema.Types.Mixed;

    // schema
    var Schema = {
        u  : {type: ObjectId, required: true, ref: 'System_Users', alias: 'users'},
        p  : {type: ObjectId, required: true, ref: 'Test_Posts', alias: 'posts'},
        b  : {type: String, required: true, alias: 'body'},
        ca : {type: Date, default: Date.now, alias: 'created_at'}
    };

    // settings
    Schema.u.settings = {label: 'User', display: 'email'};
    Schema.p.settings = {label: 'Post', display: 'title'};
    Schema.b.settings = {label: 'Body'};

    // load schema
    var CommentSchema = app.libpost.model.loader.mongoose(Schema, {
        Name: 'Test_Comments',
        Options: {
            singular : 'Test Comment',
            plural   : 'Test Comments',
            columns  : ['users', 'posts', 'body'],
            main     : 'body',
            perpage  : 25
        },
        CountRef: {
            posts: 'comments_count'
        }
    });

    // plugins
    CommentSchema.plugin(_query);

    return _mongoose.model('Test_Comments', CommentSchema);

};

You can configure the reference counting just like this;

CountRef: {
    posts: 'comments_count'
}

If the comment is removed, then the model loader updates the count. Don’t forget to add the comments_count (number) field to the test.posts model.

Field Reference Counting

If you want to count the size of a field that has a reference, then you can use the Count key. It stores the count of the data in the reference collection of the source field.

var PostSchema = app.libpost.model.loader.mongoose(Schema, {
    ...
    Count: {
        'source_field': 'target_field'
    },
    ...
});

Field Size Calculating

If you have an array field, and if you want to store the size of that array on the document itself, then you can use the Size key. Mongodb doesn’t give the size of an array by default; in order to get the array size, you have to execute an aggregation query. The Size key is simplifies this process. For example;

var PostSchema = app.libpost.model.loader.mongoose(Schema, {
    ...
    Size: {
        tags: 'tags_count'
    },
    ...
});

If you have a tags field on the test.posts model, then simply add a new tags_count field to your schema. The model loader calculates the size of the tags and updates the tags_count.

Field Hook Mechanism

If you want to push the value of a field to a collection on another reference model, then you can use the Hook key.

var PostSchema = app.libpost.model.loader.mongoose(Schema, {
    ...
    Hook: {
        push: {
            'field_of_the_source_value': 'field_of_the_target_reference:target_field',
            ...
        }
    },
    ...
});

ps: It doesn’t work on the fields that are identified as entities.

Predefined Models

Restlio has a bunch of predefined models. They are used in the Restlio system, for example user registration. You can use any predefined model you want, or use them as a reference on your models, it’s up to you.

System Models

  • system.accounts
  • system.actions
  • system.apps
  • system.filters
  • system.images
  • system.invites
  • system.locations
  • system.objects
  • system.roles
  • system.users

Caching Data

If you want to cache your data on Redis for faster response times, you can use the cacheKey query parameter.

Built-in Middlewares

Restlio has lots of built-in middlewares to simplify your work. Most of them are included by default. You have to enable some of the middlewares in order to use them.

Express Middlewares

  1. The REST API part of Restlio uses these Express middlewares: body-parser, morgan, cors.

  2. The Web application part of Restlio uses these Express middlewares. swig as a template engine, compression, static, cookie-parser, express-session with connect-redis, connect-flash and serve-favicon.

Restlio Middlewares

Restlio has a bunch of middlewares used internally. They are used on the resource endpoints, authentication endpoints, etc. Feel free to use them on your endpoints. You can find them in the middle directory, and you can use a middleware like this; app.middle.acl.

Admin UI

Restlio has an admin UI, generated from the models automatically. Write your models and start to manage your data immediately. You can also manage multiple applications from the admin UI. System models are automatically filtered with the active application ID. Look at the Admin UI Options section for detailed options.

Built-in Job Queue

Restlio has a built-in job queue based on Kue. Restlio uses it for some internal tasks, but you can easily use the job queue for your tasks. You can get the Kue object like this;

...
var kue = app.boot.kue; 
...

and easily create a job like this;

kue.create('task-name', {
    title: 'Task Title',
    params: {
        ...
    }
}).attempts(3).removeOnComplete(true).save();

Now look at your workers.js file. You have to run this file in order to start listening your job queue; $ node workers. Don’t forget to include your external worker directory.

var Restlio = require('restlio');
new Restlio({
    basedir: __dirname,
    external: {
        model: 'test',
        worker: 'test'
    }
}).workers();

Create a file under the worker directory; worker/test/my-job.js, and write your job processor.

module.exports = app => {
    var _kue = app.boot.kue;

    _kue.process('task-name', 1, (job, done) {
        var params = job.data.params;
        ...
    });
};

Built-in Cron

Restlio uses cron under the hood for cronjobs. You can easily create a cronjob like this;

module.exports = app => {
    var _cron = app.boot.cron;

    new _cron('0 */30 * * * *', () {
		...
    }, null, true);    
};

Built-in Mailer

Restlio has a built-in mailer based on Nodemailer. You can easily use the mailer to send your mails. You can configure your mailer from the configuration file; config/development.js.

boot: {
	...
    mailer: {
        'test': {
            service: 'Mailgun',
            auth: {
                user: 'Mailgun user',
                pass: 'Mailgun pass'
            },
            socketTimeout: 60000
        }
    },
    ...
}

and send your mail like this;

...
var _mailer    = app.lib.mailer;
var _transport = app.boot.mailer['test'] // 'test' is your app slug.
// send your mail
new _mailer(_transport).send({
    from: ...,
    to: ..., 
    subject: ...,
    html: ...,
    ...
}); 
...

File Uploads

Not documented

On the Fly Image Resizer

Not documented

Data Synchronization

Not documented

Oauth

Not documented

API Documentation

Not documented

License

The MIT License (MIT)

Copyright (c) 2016 Selçuk Fatih Sevinç

Permission is hereby granted, free of charge, to any person obtaining a copy
of this software and associated documentation files (the "Software"), to deal
in the Software without restriction, including without limitation the rights
to use, copy, modify, merge, publish, distribute, sublicense, and/or sell
copies of the Software, and to permit persons to whom the Software is
furnished to do so, subject to the following conditions:

The above copyright notice and this permission notice shall be included in all
copies or substantial portions of the Software.

THE SOFTWARE IS PROVIDED "AS IS", WITHOUT WARRANTY OF ANY KIND, EXPRESS OR
IMPLIED, INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO THE WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY,
FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE AND NONINFRINGEMENT. IN NO EVENT SHALL THE
AUTHORS OR COPYRIGHT HOLDERS BE LIABLE FOR ANY CLAIM, DAMAGES OR OTHER
LIABILITY, WHETHER IN AN ACTION OF CONTRACT, TORT OR OTHERWISE, ARISING FROM,
OUT OF OR IN CONNECTION WITH THE SOFTWARE OR THE USE OR OTHER DEALINGS IN THE
SOFTWARE.

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